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Welcome to the European Centre of the INI (INI-Europe)

INI-Europe has been established as a hub of INI-related activities in Europe. More detailed information is available on the concepts and visions of INI-Europe and on the internal structure.
If you wish to contribute to INI-Europe, please join the address list by clicking here (which will initialize an e-mail to be sent to europe@initrogen.org). INI Europe also features "associate activties", i.e. independent projects that fit the INI umbrella.

Publications

Author(s): 
T. A. Clair, N. Pelletier, S. Bittman, A. Leip, P. Arp, M. D. Moran, I. Dennis, D. Niemi, S. Sterling, C. F. Drury, J. Yang
Release Date: 
11/2014

Global Biogeochemical Cycles 28, 1343–1357
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2014GB004880

This paper uses a budget approach to compile information on excess reactive nitrogen (Nr) flows for Canada. Canada is a net receptor of Nr air pollution from the United States, receiving approximately 20% of the Nr leaving the U.S. airshed. Overall, terrestrial natural ecosystems as well as the atmosphere were found to be in balance between Nr inputs and outputs when all N reactive and nonreactive fluxes are included. However, when only reactive forms are considered, almost 50% of N entering the Canadian atmosphere is assumed to be lost to the oceans or to unmeasured dry deposition. Data suggest that denitrification in soils and aquatic systems is larger than what models predict.

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Author(s): 
Sutton, M.A., Mason, K.E., Sheppard, L.J., Sverdrup, H., Haeuber, R., Hicks, W.K. (Eds.)
Release Date: 
11/2014

http://www.springer.com/environment/pollution+and+remediation/book/978-94-007-7938-9

This volume compiles individual papers on nitrogen deposition globally. The contributions focus on better quantification of atmospheric deposition, development and application of critical loads methodologies, look at the assessment of impacts on biodiversity, the consequences for ecosystem services, and include approaches to developing environmental policies to manage the threats of nitrogen deposition. Progress made clearly points out an obvious lack of information on impacts outside Europe and North America, and also regarding above- and below-ground fauna. The wealth of information on nitrogen effects on floral biodiversity clearly is helpful to the work under the Convention on Biological Diversity, specifically the Aichi biodiversity target 8 that aims to abate nutrient deposition detrimental to biodiversity.

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Author(s): 
de Vries, Du, Butterbach-Bahl
Release Date: 
10/2014

Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Vol. 9-10, October 2014, pp. 90-104

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cosust.2014.09.001

The carbon to nitrogen response of forest ecosystems depends on the possible occurrence of nitrogen limitation versus possible co-limitations by other drivers, such as low temperature or availability of phosphorus. A combination of nitrogen retention estimates and stoichiometric scaling is used to illustrate the most likely carbon–nitrogen responses for needle-leaved and broadleaved forests to atmospheric nitrogen deposition.

 

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Author(s): 
de Vries, Dobbertin, Solberg, van Dobben, Schaub
Release Date: 
07/2014

Plant and Soil, July 2014, Volume 380, Issue 1-2, pp 1-45

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11104-014-2056-2

Results from monitoring studies, both at a European wide scale and related national studies, are presented in terms of measured trends and geographic variation in N and S deposition and O3 concentrations/exposure, followed by results on effects of elevated N and S inputs and/or O3 exposure and/or climate on (i) Nutrient status, (ii) Forest health, (iii) Forest growth and (iv) Species diversity of the ground vegetation.

 

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Author(s): 
Wim de Vries
Release Date: 
06/2014

Nature Climate Change 4, 425-426 (2014). 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2255

Global carbon budgets indicate that approximately 27% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions are stored in terrestrial ecosystems with a similar percentage stored in the oceans. Of the terrestrial ecosystems, forests are by far the most important carbon sink, due to the long storage time of carbon in stem wood. Analysis of data from 92 forested sites across the globe indicates that nutrient availability is the dominant driver of carbon retention in forests.

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Pages

Our Director

Kevin Hicks

Country: 
United Kingdom
Affiliation: 
SEI
Deputy Centre Director and Senior Research Associate, Stockholm Environment Institute at York, Environment Department, University of York, UK
Kevin has been a research associate at SEI since 1997 and has 25 years’ experience in the field of air pollution. He has a B.Sc. in Plant Science from the University of Liverpool (1989) and a Ph.D. on ‘The Importance to Upland Vegetation of Enhanced Nitrogen Deposition at High Altitude’ from the Department of Plant and Soil Science, University of Aberdeen, Scotland, UK (1996). His current research interests cover air pollution impacts, especially of nitrogen, on terrestrial ecosystems, linkages between air pollution and climate change, and the transfer of scientific information to the policy process.
He has extensive experience of international cooperation on air pollution issues in Europe and in developing countries and has helped organize various workshops, including a global meeting on Nitrogen Deposition, Critical Loads and Biodiversity in Edinburgh, UK, in 2009. He helped coordinate the 2011 UNEP/WMO Integrated Assessment of Black Carbon and Tropospheric Ozone and is active in the follow-up work in developing countries under the Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC), where he is interested in the development of national action planning and the linkages between energy, food production and water and air quality management in the agricultural sector.
 
He served on the INI Europe Steering Group under Wilfried Winiwarter from 2013 to 2016, before becoming the INI Europe Director in December 2016.

Contact Us

Contact Person: 
Kevin Hicks
Address: 
Stockholm Environment Institute
University of York
York
YO10 5NG
United Kingdom