globeEurope

Welcome to the European Centre of the INI (INI-Europe)

INI-Europe has been established as a hub of INI-related activities in Europe. More detailed information is available on the concepts and visions of INI-Europe and on the internal structure.
If you wish to contribute to INI-Europe, please join the address list by clicking here (which will initialize an e-mail to be sent to europe@initrogen.org). INI Europe also features "associate activties", i.e. independent projects that fit the INI umbrella.

News

No entries where found for this item.

Pages

Events

Dates: 
11/05/2014 (All day) to 11/07/2014 (All day)
Dates: 
10/01/2014 - 09:00 to 10/02/2014 - 15:00

Pages

Publications

Author(s): 
van Grinsven, Spiertz, Westhoek, Bouwman, Erisman
Release Date: 
11/2013

The Journal of Agricultural Science, in press.

 http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0021859613000853

Building on the 2011 European Nitrogen Assessment, this paper reviews key features of the complex relationships between N use and food production in Europe in order to develop novel options for a more N-efficient, less N-polluting and secure European food system. Option considered include relocating feed and livestock production from Northwestern to Central and Eastern Europe, or convincing consumers with a Western diet to eat less meat and dairy by communicating the associated health benefits and smaller ecological footprints.

region: 
Author(s): 
Van Grinsven, Holland, Jacobsen, Klimont, Sutton, Willems
Release Date: 
03/2013

Environ. Sci. Technol., 2013, 47 (8), pp 3571–3579. 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es303804g

This paper provides a critical and comprehensive assessment of costs and benefits of the various flows of N on human health, ecosystems and climate stability in order to identify major options for mitigation. The social cost of impacts of N in the EU27 in 2008 was estimated between €75–485 billion per year. A cost share of around 60% is related to emissions to air. The share of total impacts on human health is about 45% and may reflect the higher willingness to pay for human health than for ecosystems or climate stability.

region: 
Author(s): 
Winiwarter, Leip, Tuomisto, Haastrup
Release Date: 
10/2014

Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 2014, 9–10:37–45, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cosust.2014.07.004
This review paper takes a look at long-term aspects of future technology, specifically in agriculture, and how it may affect emission of greenhouse gases. Innovations specifically addressing agriculture are:
reduced meat diets, urban gardening, genetically modified crops, and precision farming, moreover more distant options such as vertical farming and cultured meat production (i.e., indoor agriculture) are discussed according to existing design studies. Both abatement potential and costs are discussed, even if only indications can be given for a quantification.

region: 
Author(s): 
Pierer, Winiwarter, Leach, Galloway
Release Date: 
12/2014

Food Policy 49 (2014) 128–136, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2014.07.004
Nitrogen footprints are used as indicators of environmental impacts of food production under Austrian conditions. Differences are evaluated by food type (meat vs. vegetables), food quality is reflected by differentiating calorific value and protein content. Extending footprints to all human activities still shows food to be the most important factor of nitrogen release per person.  

region: 
Author(s): 
Wim de Vries
Release Date: 
04/2014

Nutrients trigger carbon storage (News and Views), in: Nature Climate Change 4, 425-6 (2014) - see http://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/v4/n6/full/nclimate2255.html

Commenting on an article by Fernandez-Martinez et al., this “News and Views” piece concludes that nutrient availability is the dominant driver of carbon retention in forests, based on an analysis of data from 92 forested sites across the globe.

region: 

Pages

Our Director

Kevin Hicks

Country: 
United Kingdom
Affiliation: 
SEI
Deputy Centre Director and Senior Research Associate, Stockholm Environment Institute at York, Environment Department, University of York, UK
Kevin has been a research associate at SEI since 1997 and has 25 years’ experience in the field of air pollution. He has a B.Sc. in Plant Science from the University of Liverpool (1989) and a Ph.D. on ‘The Importance to Upland Vegetation of Enhanced Nitrogen Deposition at High Altitude’ from the Department of Plant and Soil Science, University of Aberdeen, Scotland, UK (1996). His current research interests cover air pollution impacts, especially of nitrogen, on terrestrial ecosystems, linkages between air pollution and climate change, and the transfer of scientific information to the policy process.
He has extensive experience of international cooperation on air pollution issues in Europe and in developing countries and has helped organize various workshops, including a global meeting on Nitrogen Deposition, Critical Loads and Biodiversity in Edinburgh, UK, in 2009. He helped coordinate the 2011 UNEP/WMO Integrated Assessment of Black Carbon and Tropospheric Ozone and is active in the follow-up work in developing countries under the Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC), where he is interested in the development of national action planning and the linkages between energy, food production and water and air quality management in the agricultural sector.
 
He served on the INI Europe Steering Group under Wilfried Winiwarter from 2013 to 2016, before becoming the INI Europe Director in December 2016.

Contact Us

Contact Person: 
Kevin Hicks
Address: 
Stockholm Environment Institute
University of York
York
YO10 5NG
United Kingdom